Connections with Hawaiki: the Evidence of a Shell Tool from Wairau Bar, Marlborough, New Zealand

  • Janet Davidson Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • Amy Findlater
  • Roger Fyfe The Canterbury Museum, Rolleston Avenue, Christchurch 8013.
  • Judith MacDonald
  • Bruce Marshall
Keywords: Wairau Bar, Hawaiki, shell tool, Terebridae, Acus crenulatus, East Polynesian Archaic.

Abstract

A tool from the archaeological site at Wairau Bar, New Zealand, is identified as an import from the tropical Pacific. The tool was made by working a cutting edge on the apex of a spiral gastropod shell, identified as Acus crenulatus (formerly Terebra crenulata) (family Terebridae). Similar tools have been found in a number of sites in tropical East Polynesia, dating to the same general time period as Wairau Bar. The tool supports the view that the Wairau Bar site was a pioneering settlement close in time to the initial Polynesian arrival in New Zealand.
How to Cite
Davidson, J., Findlater, A., Fyfe, R., MacDonald, J. and Marshall, B. (1) “Connections with Hawaiki: the Evidence of a Shell Tool from Wairau Bar, Marlborough, New Zealand”, Journal of Pacific Archaeology, 2(2), pp. 93-102. Available at: https://pacificarchaeology.org/index.php/journal/article/view/54 (Accessed: 25June2019).
Section
Research Reports

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