Evidence of a well-developed obsidian distribution network in the Far North of New Zealand: new data from the Aupouri Peninsula

  • Phillip Moore Peninsula Research
  • John Coster
Keywords: Aupouri Peninsula, obsidian, distribution network

Abstract

New analyses of obsidian artefact assemblages from 53 archaeological sites located on sand dunes of the western Aupouri Peninsula indicate that a well-developed distribution network operated in this area from the late 15th to 18th century. During the 16th – early 17th century this network included several key ‘high activity’ sites, containing large numbers of obsidian and other artefacts, which are considered to have acted as re-distribution centres. These formed part of at least four separate site clusters, apparently representing relatively long-term settlements. Most of the obsidian was procured, probably by a combination of direct access and exchange, from the Pungaere and Mayor Island sources, with lesser amounts from Coromandel Peninsula, Great Barrier Island, and Huruiki.

Published
2015-02-22
How to Cite
Moore, P. and Coster, J. (2015) “Evidence of a well-developed obsidian distribution network in the Far North of New Zealand: new data from the Aupouri Peninsula”, Journal of Pacific Archaeology, 6(1), pp. 1-17. Available at: https://pacificarchaeology.org/index.php/journal/article/view/135 (Accessed: 23July2019).
Section
Articles