Middens historically significant on a Northland landscape are key to demonstrating ecological degradation in an adjacent estuary

  • John Booth Private researcher
  • Bill G. Edwards Heritage New Zealand

Abstract

Cockles (Austrovenus stutchburyi) dominate Māori middens near Hororoa Point, in mid-Kerikeri Inlet, Bay of Islands, New Zealand, essentially all being 27–55-mm long, disarticulated individuals. Historical records show that significant cockle harvesting was taking place nearby in at least the early-1800s, yet, despite little or no harvesting now for decades, dense cockle beds in this area today contain low proportions >30 mm long, and few individuals exceed 35 mm. The middens provide critical insight into the degraded nature of this cockle population today compared with late-historical times, a situation that appears to prevail around much of the Bay of Islands.

Published
2020-07-22
How to Cite
Booth, J. and Edwards, B. (2020) “Middens historically significant on a Northland landscape are key to demonstrating ecological degradation in an adjacent estuary”, Journal of Pacific Archaeology, 11(2), pp. 115-123. Available at: https://pacificarchaeology.org/index.php/journal/article/view/299 (Accessed: 30October2020).
Section
Articles

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