States without Archaeological Correlates? A Report from Hawaiʻi

  • James M Bayman University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
  • Thomas S Dye University of Hawaiʻi
  • Timothy M Rieth International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc.

Abstract

 

Two recent archaeological narratives of ancient Hawaiian society apply a neo-evolutionary approach to political development to argue that a primary state evolved prior to contact with Europeans in the late 18th century. Our analysis demonstrates that this finding is based on interpretations of indigenous oral traditions and contact-period historical accounts but lacks archaeological warrant. The Hawaiian archaeological record does not yield the conventional neo-evolutionary correlates of statehood. Moreover, archaeological evidence for the neo-evolutionary model of ladder-like transformation is also lacking.  A chronological analysis of Hawaiian political development inferred from the archaeological record reveals that it was a seamless process, with no evidence of a disjuncture when a statehood event might have occurred. We advocate a historical approach to investigating political development in Hawai‘i that articulates directly with the archaeological record, and is sufficiently developed and general to be applicable elsewhere in the world.

Published
2021-04-07
How to Cite
Bayman, J., Dye, T. and Rieth, T. (2021) “States without Archaeological Correlates? A Report from Hawaiʻi”, Journal of Pacific Archaeology, 12(1), pp. 47-71. Available at: https://pacificarchaeology.org/index.php/journal/article/view/315 (Accessed: 1December2021).
Section
Articles